To GT-Lorraine...and Beyond!

25 years of academic excellence and adventure

Month: April 2017 (Page 1 of 2)

StrasBurke

As crazy as it feels, the semester is finally winding down, I just finished my last midterm and handed in my last assignment, so it’s just finals, finals, finals from here on out. But before I descend into the cocoon of studying, I planned a few more trips. I feel like I might be a little bit crazy, but I scheduled a trip to visit friends in northern Germany during finals, so this weekend actually constituted my second to last trip of the year. In addition, it also happened to be my birthday, so there was no way I was staying at home to study. Strasbourg is a very beautiful and bustling city right on the German border and was a wonderful birthday getaway destination.

Strasbourg Cathedral

My girlfriend and I arrived in Strasbourg on Friday night, ready for a little night-time exploring and some local food. For some reason, the area we were staying in seemed to be completely taken over by Italian-themed restaurants and since we both had not had pizza in a very long time, we caved and decided to eat at a cute little restaurant near our AirBnB. All the times I’ve previously traveled with Sarah this semester have been in German speaking countries, and as she is fluent in German, communication has never really been a problem. However, now that we decided to travel in France this time, we were faced with a harsh language barrier right off the bat. Neither of us speak French very well, and not all French speak more than one language. As such, our pizza night was quite an awkward adventure where I seemed to make a fool of myself trying and failing to speak French every time we came in contact with our waiter. Still, we made it through and had fun laughing about it afterwards, and were ready for another day of awkwardness.

On the one real day of being able to experience the city, we had a light breakfast from a bakery and decided to just walk around and see what we could see. Neither of us are really much for planning, so that seems to be how most of our trips go. Strasbourg has some really amazing architecture that includes this enormous cathedral that we even had the privilege of getting to see from the inside. For lunch, we decided on a traditional French restaurant near the city center, and I don’t know if it was because I had spent a little time brushing up on my French the night before, or more likely that since we were in the center of town the waiting staff was much more accustomed to serving non-native French speakers, but the interactions I had were overall very positive. That is until the end of the meal when I assume the server asked if we were done with our plates, and Sarah misinterpreted and responded by saying “Bien” and smiling. I laughed about that for awhile. After lunch we of course stopped for ice cream, finding a fun gelato place that shaped all their ice cream into flowers. After more walking around and such, we decided we would cook dinner ourselves, so we went to the grocery store to obtain the supplies necessary for mushroom, bacon, swiss bbq burgers. Of course the cooking didn’t quite go as well as planned, but we enjoyed attempting to make something that reminded us of home.

I’ve enjoyed traveling this semester so much, and it’s sad to see it all come to end. The countries I’ve visited – France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and more – have been truly amazing, and I can’t wait for my very last trip next week. Of course, despite all the fun this year has been, I am more than ready to go home and be able to walk into a store and talk to the clerk in English. It’s the little things that you miss when you’re away from home, but I love the little things I experience here in Europe every day just as much.

Meet Remi Gourdon: New Grad Student with New Ideas

I met with Remi right outside his robotics class. Sidestepping a moving robot as another student navigated it through the hall, we sat on the couches to talk. Remi was friendly and helpful, clearly a hard-working person. At GTL for only four months, he has been here as long as we have. He was able to give me some insight in the differences between U.S. and French education. Here are his responses to some of the questions that I asked him.
What made you want to come to GTL?
I spent a summer as a U.S. university for professional development in Ohio in a small town. I had the opportunity to come to Georgia Tech from my school, and I took it. I wanted to experience more U.S.-style education.
What is your favorite part about GTL?
I like the way the courses are taught. It is very different from French engineering school. There are a lot of projects and practical work, as opposed to lots of lectures and tests. It gives time to read books and learn material and is more interesting when you can apply the theory you learn right away.
Are you working on any research right now?
I am working on a special problem in the robotics lab. It is not what you think of when you think of a traditional robot. Its function is the detection of faults in metal plates using ultrasonics. I am in charge of the processing of the signal, but we have lots of people who work on other aspects like mechanical and electrical.
What do you like to do for fun?
The amount of work here is different from what we are used to. This limits what I can do outside of school. This last weekend though, I visited Metz in daylight for the first time. It was very beautiful and I enjoyed to walk there.
Do you have any advice for new GTL students?
Be prepared for some cold. Be prepared [for] a much smaller campus. I spent a summer at a large campus and it is much different than here. At the same time it is good to have a small group that you can get to know. Make friends with the people, because they can help you in school and in travels.

All By Myself

Courtesy of powerofthemusic.com

I flew into France within the first couple days of the New Year, and that was the first time that I truly traveled solo. Landing in Paris was pretty scary for me: I was lumbering around with a huge suitcase and no idea where to go next. Without luck, I was walking around the airport, looking for the meeting point for the shuttle that was supposed to take me and some other students over to GTL. On top of an already stressful situation, I was made fully aware that I was in a country in which English was not the primary or even secondary language spoken. This not only made me feel extremely uncomfortable and out of place, but it just made my primary objective that much harder to complete. Finally, after the supposed last call for the shuttle to leave, I found them all and made it in the van just in time. That was one of the most nerve-wracking situations I’ve ever been in. I thought that I was going to be stranded at the airport, all by myself, without being able to communicate to others that I was definitely not supposed to be both at the airport or alone. I would have really been fine with just taking one of those two options.

That was back in January, and I just recently made another solo trip, but this time it was about three days long, and in the Czech Republic (where their official language is literally not spoken anywhere else). Now, I feel a lot more comfortable with being in new and unfamiliar situations. I’m able to ask questions to locals without the thought that they are going to see me as dumb looming over my head. I can now confidently say that living in another country really matured me in aspects of my life I never even considered as problematic. Even talking to my friends and others in English, I’ve noticed that I’m a lot more confident in myself, and it’s a nice feeling to have!

In the past, I would too often get caught up in what others thought of me, and would always try to please them, even if it was at my expense. Many times, this would result in me missing out on activities or events I wanted to attend. This is what I’ve learned from living here: if you ever get a chance to do something, but no one will go with you, go by yourself! There is nothing wrong with it, and you will most likely regret not going at all more than going solo. You’ll also probably meet some interesting characters and have new material for stories to tell at dinner parties!

Although traveling solo can seem daunting, you’ll be amazed at how adaptable we, as humans, are. With time, you’ll be riding the metro and ordering your meals like a pro. Whenever I’m speaking to locals, I try to start off the conversation in French, and then if I can’t get my point across, I switch to English and hope they can understand me. Weirdly enough, even if neither of us can understand what the other is saying, I can usually decipher what they’re telling me using hand gestures and context. And while I highly recommend learning at least a little bit of French before coming to GTL, this way isn’t too bad!

Easter Break: From Witches to Waffles

This weekend I got to see my family again! The weekend kicked off in Riquewihr, a small town in France dating back to the 1500s, known for its beautiful vineyards and amazing architecture. Every house looked like a gingerbread house, the cobblestone streets were winding and sloping, and the roofs were topped with old tile or thatch. We spent the day walking through the town, hiking through the vineyards and sampling local foods. I even had frog legs!

Here is a picture of me in the town of Riquewihr.

As we walked through the town, we couldn’t help but notice that there were witches hanging in every doorway. These wooden or porcelain doll witches ranged from scary to cute, and dark to colorful. We walked through the streets puzzled, until we found a shop that sold witches exclusively. After talking to the clerk, we learned the reason. Legend has it that a young widow was banished from the town for being a witch. As she gathered her things and left, she spotted enemy soldiers approaching the town. She ran back as fast as she could to warn everyone, and the town was able to protect itself from attack. As a result, hanging a witch by the door or the window as a lookout will bring good luck and help you keep your enemies out.

The next day we hopped in our rental car and began driving north. Destination: Brussels. We stopped in Strasbourg for lunch, eating in the old city and admiring the tudor-style houses. Next, we forged on to Metz so my family could see where I am going to school and spending my weekdays. I showed them the cathedral and my dorm. Late that night, after a great deal of rain and traffic, we arrived in Brussels.

Picture of my lovely sister Kat in Strasbourg.

My mother and sisters flew back to the USA the next morning. My dad had business in London and would stay with me another day. After dropping them at the airport, we decided to take a quick train ride over to Bruges, an economic capital of Europe where luxury goods were traded and crafted. Famous for its tapestries and lace, this old city gives off an air of luxury. All of the facades of the houses were carved in amazing detail, and many roofs and windows were gilded. After a nice lunch of traditional stew, and a waffle for dessert we browsed the lace and tapestry shops. It is amazing how intricate these two thread-based art forms are; many pieces can take years to complete. We returned to Brussels that night and went to sleep.

Picture of the main square in Brussels.

The last day, we woke up early for a nice breakfast. We then decided to take a long walk through the city to see the Sablon district, famous for its antiques and old books. We then made our way over to the European Parliament and the Victory arch. After a brisk morning of walking and photo taking, we returned to the Grand Place, the big square surrounded by old fancy buildings. After a bit of sightseeing, we had to part ways.

All in all, it was a lovely weekend.

BDE Skis: The Best Bonding Experience for GTL

Last night, a whole gaggle of GTL students piled onto a bus and ventured forth to embark on a snowy winter adventure. Snow, in 60 degree weather you ask? Well, the wonderful BDE (a sort of the student council of GTL) organized a trip to Snow Hall, one of the largest indoor skiing facilities anywhere. We all chatted excitedly as the bus sped through the countryside. The group, a mix of beginners and experienced skiers and snowboarders, were bristling with anticipation as we entered the facility. The French-speaking students took the lead as we spoke to the friendly staff to acquire our skis and snowboards.

After acquiring my skis, boots, poles, and helmet, I was able to proceed to the facility. Temperature-controlled at exactly 0° Celsius and covered in powder, the facility was quite vast. Built up the side of the hill boasting a beginner slope, intermediate slope and terrain park, two ski lifts and a friendly staff, it was crazy to imagine that all of this fit inside a warehouse. The beginners headed to the bunny slope and the old timers headed toward the intermediate.

Watching the way the GTL community came together to help the new skiers and snowboarders was truly amazing. From helping them pick the best equipment, to making sure they knew how to use the lifts, to teaching them the basics, it was truly great to see everyone so helpful to each other. In the words of brand new skier, Mr. Ben Frumpkin, “This was a crazy amount of fun.”

When people fell, GTL acquaintances were there to help them up and get their equipment back together. Everyone was friendly, waving and cheering each other on as they passed on the ski lift. There were friendly competitions on who could get the most air on the small bumps on the slope. The BDE staff, especially Zivan, who helpfully handed out and collected cards, and sprinted between the bus and the desk to make sure that everything had been returned properly.

My favorite experience was watching the beginners try the intermediate hill for the first time. Their friends went right behind them to make sure they were all right. Teeth bared and leaning forward they traveled slowly down. Their faces full of determination, and pride at what they had accomplished. I think everyone shared in the excitement of these newbies learning a new skill. It was also really awesome to see some members trying out the terrain park, going over massive jumps and grinding on rails.

All in all, I am very proud to say that I love BDE and I love the GTL community. We have definitely been brought closer together.

Munich: The Ultimate Food Guide

Munich is a beautiful city, and although it 90% of it was destroyed in the second world war, the rebuilding efforts for the 1972 Olympics have preserved the old world charm of the classic Bavarian city.

This is the Neues Rathaus, the city government building in the center of town.

So, my posts have been quite history heavy lately, so I decided to change things up this week and talk about my favorite food: Bavarian Food. With its amazing ham dishes, wonderful sauces and great atmosphere, the food scene in Munich cannot be beat. Here are some of my favorite Munich foods, ranked from 5th-most delicious to most delicious:

5. Bratwurst mit Sauerkraut

You can never go wrong with bratwurst in Munich. Sold on the street at small stands, in restaurants, or in beer halls, this Bavarian classic is a go-to tourist food. Bratwurst is served as a nice thick sausage, served in a small bread roll so the ends stick out, topped with tangy sauerkraut. Deliciously messy, this is really fun to eat  and an absolute must-taste in Munich! Where was the best one I tasted? In a small street stand right across from the Neues Rathaus in the city center.

 

4. Kartoffelpuffer (Potato Pancakes)

Vegetarian? No problem! Due to Lenten restrictions, I was unable to eat meat on Friday. As a result, I tried one of my new favorite dishes- Kartoffelpuffer! With the consistency of a flattened hashbrown, crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, served with applesauce or sauerkraut, you will be singing the praises of this dish in no time!

 

3. Spanferkel (Suckling Pig)

This delicious cut of pork is so tender you can cut it with a fork and it melts in your mouth. Typically served with potatoes and in a dark brown beer gravy, this dish is the perfect ending to a day of sightseeing. Where did I find the best Spanferkel? The Augustiner Keller, famous beer garden restaurant of Munich. Definitely worth a taste!

 

2. Weisswurst (White Sausage)

I love weisswurst, which is a white colored sausage made from pork and veal back bacon ground with herbs. Traditionally, weisswurst was a breakfast food because before refrigeration, it was the sausage that kept the least fresh and was therefore a dish for the morning! Where is the best weisswurst in the city? Pay a visit to the Viktualienmarkt close to Marienplatz. This outdoor market has the finest meats and crafts in Bavaria. Pro tip: Peel the skin off before you eat it. Although you can eat the skin, the locals may laugh at you a bit.

 

1. Schweinshaxe (Pork Knuckle)
The number one delicacy of Munich is Schweinshaxe, which is a particular cut of pork. With its amazing, crispy skin on the outside, and a texture reminiscent of roast beef but the tenderness or pork you can’t go wrong with this dish. Served with baked potatoes, it is the most highly acclaimed Bavarian dish. Where to get the best one? Pay a visit to the historic Hofbrauhaus! In addition to hearing amazing live music from a traditional brass band, you can enjoy some of the best food that Bavaria has to offer. Happy eating!

Top 5 Best Museums I Have Visited and Why You Should Go

I love museums. They are my absolute favorite activity everywhere we go. No matter the subject, museums are a great way to immerse yourself in something and really learn what it is all about. Getting lost in these amazing buildings is a way to expand your mind, appreciate beauty, and have a really fun time. I am using this blog to honor my favorites.
 
5. Schindler’s Factory (Krakow)
This museum, located on the site of Oskar Schindler’s enamel factory, is a brilliant memorial and tribute to the victims of the Holocaust, as well as an immersive experience of what daily life was like for German citizens at the time. Starting in the pre-war 1930’s, you walk room to room, reading firsthand accounts of events, seeing startling photographs, and being immersed in recreations of important rooms such as courtrooms, rooms of Jewish ghettos, and other such places. The reason this museum was so special was that it gave you a personal connection to the people of the Holocaust, and helped you walk in the shoes of the people that faced these struggles. Highly recommended.

Schindler’s Factory Museum. (Photo courtesy of the Daily Mail.)

 

4. Capitoline Museum (Rome)

Many museums, such as the Vatican Museum, are so opulent and full of priceless artifacts that it can be overwhelming. The Capitoline Museum in Rome was different, in that the art and artifacts were presented in a way that wasn’t cluttered, but rather displayed in an open environment. Housing many ancient Roman and Greek artifacts, we learned many things about popular legends, the gods and goddesses, and the daily life of the ancient Romans. What really made this place stand out was the amazing view of the Roman forum. Directly overhanging the forum, this museum offers unencumbered views of all the ancient ruins in the best vantage point you can get. Go here for the views!

The view of the forum from the Capitoline Museum.

 

3. Musée D’Orsay (Paris)
This beautiful museum not only houses amazing art, but is a beautiful building with spectacular architecture. Boasting art from all periods of history, this museum is comprehensive in its display of art history. From medieval art, to the hall of impressionists on the top floor, you won’t be bored in this museum. Highlights include a full model of the Paris Opera house, the most extensive collection of impressionist art in the world, and beautiful sculptures; this is a great place to go celebrate the artistic achievements of mankind.

View from the top floor of the Musee D’Orsay.

 

2. The Deutsches Museum (Munich)
The engineer in all of us is dancing for joy in the Deutsches museum. This science museum is great for people of all ages. There was a metallurgy section and a mining section, which was really interesting for me as a Materials Science Engineer, and an early machines and machine shop section which particularly excited my Mechanical Engineering friends. This vast museum holds amazing copies of all kinds of machines, helps you learn about various manufacturing techniques, and does so in a hands-on and interesting way. In the maritime navigation section, there was a tank where you could sail different hulled model boats across to examine the different wake patterns, for example. Block out a whole day for this museum. It took us all morning to see the first floor!

The steam machine room of the Deutsches Museum.

 

1.  The Van Gogh Museum (Amsterdam)

This museum was a life changer. As someone who is a bit of a worrier and gets hung up in the details, Van Gogh’s paintings prove that the picture doesn’t have to be exactly right to be beautiful. Each floor of the museum represents a part of his life, from his early dabblings in art to his final days in the mental institution. Not only do you see his life story in his work (he always paints his surroundings) but you learn his life story through his personal letters to his friends and family.

The museum takes a delicate look at mental illness, and shows that Van Gogh was not a violent madman, such as when he cut off his ear, but rather a troubled person, afraid of the rush of the cities, longing for the serene peace of the country and the solitude it brought. Although the entrance fee is a bit hefty, this is for a reason. The museum is expertly crafted to be easy to follow, easy to grasp and moving to look at. I must say I shed quite a few tears in this museum. Definitely the best I have been to.

The Van Gogh Museum, photo courtesy of Luuk Kramer of the Arch Daily

GTL’s WIE Scholarship Recipients

This past weekend, I got to interview the four wonderful ladies who were the lucky recipients of the Women In Engineering (WIE) Scholarship! Emily Eastburn, Lauren Boulger, Rachel Clark, and Elaine Johnson all won scholarships awarded by the Women in Engineering program for being exemplary students not only in their academics, but in their daily lives as well. Respectively, the scholarships were funded by Arconic, General Motors, United Technologies, and Saint Gobain. These four are out of the 169 inspiring young women to win, the rest of whom are at GT-A and not GTL for this semester. The Women in Engineering program at Tech is one of the largest in the country – and gives out the most scholarships of any women in engineering program.
 
Here are some of the questions I asked them:
 
1. What year are you in and what is your major?
2. Why did you choose to come to GTL? How are you liking France (Europe) so far?
3. What has been your best European adventure?
4. What are your plans after GT?
5. What is your dream job and why?
 

 

Emily Eastburn (Arconic)

 I am a second year Materials Science Engineering (MSE) major. I chose GTL because I wanted to take classes that counted towards my major, and I have always wanted to travel Europe. My favorite adventure was spring break in Italy because it was so gorgeous, and the food was amazing! I am planning on going to grad school after GT. Hopefully for a PhD in biomaterials or bioengineering. My dream job would be working in a lab on prosthetics or tissue engineering. I want to be able engineer something that will make someone’s life better through bioengineering.
 

Lauren Boulger (General Motors)

I am majoring in Industrial and Systems Engineering (SyE), and I am in my fourth year. I wanted to come to Europe (for the first time) to expand my horizons and experience awesome places. I have loved it all, but Normandy was the place that surprised me the most. I went to Mont Saint-Michel and climbed the cliffs of Étretat, and they were amazing. I hope to work in supply chain and maybe a rotational program. My dream job would be a VP of supply chain, as it would challenge me to combine everything I’ve learned with leadership skills.
 

Rachel Clark (United Technologies)

I am a 2nd year, majoring in Electrical Engineering. I chose to visit GTL because it is an incredible opportunity to visit Europe and continue to take classes that count towards my degree. GTL is a great study abroad program for ECE students because they offer so many major classes. Also, I am an out of state student, so GTL is a deal!
I loved exploring some of the cities close to Metz with my roommate, Ashleigh! We spent the weekend visiting Nancy and Strasbourg. It was interesting to see the drastic differences between two cities that are so close together. Nancy has an almost Parisian vibe, with a beautiful, ornately decorated square. Strasbourg, on the other hand, looks much more German, with a gothic cathedral and medieval half-timbered houses. Ashleigh always says they remind her of the houses in Beauty and the Beast! It has a fascinating history, constantly switching between French and German possession. It is so interesting to visit cities so close to where we live that have such different cultures!
After GT, I plan on working as a software engineer in the defense industry, hopefully developing products that help the US military. My dream job would be a job where I can work on my interests within EE, which include signal processing, software engineering, and digital design. I would love to work on both the hardware and software sides of a product.
 

Elaine Johnson (Saint Gobain)

I am a second year Materials Science and Engineering major with a German minor. I chose to come to GTL because I knew it would be a great opportunity to explore Europe and meet other Tech students, while also staying on track with my degree. Europe has been absolutely incredible so far. It’s crazy to think about how many countries and cultures I have had the opportunity to experience in these past four months! My best European adventure so far has probably been hiking with friends through the Black Forest in Germany.

After GT I hope to attend graduate school for engineering. My dream job has always been to work in the automotive industry and work with cars. But the more I learn through school and in the research field, the more my dream job changes!
 
Congratulations to these wonderful young ladies!

Take on Me by (Pr)A-ha!

One of the buildings at Námēstí Míru.I recently made a solo trip out to one of the most beautiful cities I have ever laid my eyes upon: Prague, or as its called in Czech, Praha! I spent about three days there, standing in awe beneath enormous churches and eating various versions of traditional Czech goulash. This city had some of the most breathtaking buildings, very much inspired by the Gothic architecture movement originating in France, from the twelfth to the sixteenth century.

Originally coined as Opus Franciginum (“French Work”), Gothic Architecture was envisioned by Abbot Suger of the Church of Saint Denis. By the time of his death, Abbot Suger had also invented what is known as a façade (the very intricately decorated and detailed front of a building, intended to set the tone for the rest of the edifice), and the rose window (a circular form of stained glass with different colorings or tracings suggestive in the form of a rose). Very characteristic of the medieval period, Gothic architecture spread all throughout Europe, but had a larger influence in Eastern European countries, including the Czech Republic.

One of the views from the clock tower in the center of Prague!

My temporary home was in Vinohrady, which is also home to Námēstí Míru, literally translating to “Peace Square.” From my BnB, I could even see the Church of Saint Ludmila, which is a Neo-Gothic Church right in the center of Námēstí Míru, built from 1888-1893 by Bohemian architect Josef Mocker. Mocker also completed the St. Vitus Cathedral in the Prague Castle, which I had the chance to visit as well! The Prague Castle, or Pražský hrad, is the largest ancient castle in the world, according to Guinness Book of World Records, and it attracts over 1.8 million visitors each year. It dates all the way back to the ninth century, and is now the official residence of the President of the Czech Republic. The castle also holds the Bohemian Crown Jewels, which are the fourth oldest in Europe!

A stained glass window in the Cathedral of St. Vitus (feat. old guy and companion).

While taking a break from the beautiful sights, I made my way through the labyrinth of tiny, cobbled streets, on a search for the perfect goulash! I knew that this was a traditional Czech dish, so I had to try some while I was there. The first restaurant I went to seemed relatively new, and even though it had a traditional menu, the decor and atmosphere was very modern. A little strange, but I actually liked it a lot! I ordered some goulash, and what was served to me was not at all what I was expecting.

I thought goulash was some kind of soup with beans and chunks of meat or something, maybe I would get a bread roll on the side, but instead of finding that mess, I saw a beautifully plated hunk of beef, covered in this red, slightly spicy, but incredibly delicious sauce. To top that, it was served with four potato rolls, which I can only explain as really dense bread rolls with the flavor of a potato. That was one of the best meals I’ve ever had, and I didn’t think it could get any better, so actually my quest for the best goulash ended at this little hole in the wall, of which I could not remember and definitely couldn’t pronounce the name, but it was about two blocks from my BnB! I just went there every night for a good dinner, sometimes I also for lunch, to fill my stomach to its physical capacity.

My favorite metro sign: Náméstí Míru!

Because of my shortened food quest, and still not having visited all the places I wanted to see, I would definitely visit Prague again – no doubt. Next time though, maybe with a little more diversity in my meals? I’d like to see something other than goulash with different kinds of meat on my plate! And so, until next week’s adventure, I bid thee farewell!

Meet Brandon Carroll: Soon-to-be-Doctor and Excellent ECE Professor

Walking into Brandon Carroll’s office hours, I could tell that he had a lot on his plate. Answering a student’s question, his laptop screen filled with graphs and his notebook annotated in detail, it was easy to tell that this is a man of multitasking. I was thrilled that he had time for a few questions for the blog. He is one of my favorite professors, and has a knack for knowing exactly what the students mean when they ask questions, which is a rare gift. Here are some of the questions I asked him.

What classes do you teach right now?

I teach ECE 3710, which is a circuits class. It is definitely less stressful than my other class, which is ECE 3048. It’s a junior level Electrical Engineering class about signals and systems. It is a LOT of math, with Fourier and Laplace transforms. It has a lot of things that I haven’t done in a while. But you certainly learn the material better if you have to teach it.

What are you working on right now besides teaching?

I am working on my PhD with Dr. Anderson at the moment. So I have to work a lot on writing and defending my thesis. My research is about using machine learning algorithms to study chicken behavior based on sound. We put a microphone in the chicken house and analyze the sounds they make to determine how they are feeling. People are really interested in animal welfare, and if perfected, this system could replace the method of taking cortisol samples, which stress the animals out. This would be a way to measure the system without disturbing it, and would really benefit animal welfare.

What is your favorite part about being a professor?

Someone came up to me the other day and said, “This is the first time I ever fully understood convolution.” You can tell they are understanding something they didn’t before. Seeing that light come on is really rewarding.

What is your favorite part about GTL?

I haven’t thought about it a whole lot. This is my first year at GTL. It has been a lot of fun trying to learn a new language, although finding the time for that is hard. I love experiencing the culture around here. The food and baguettes are really amazing. The scenery around Metz is really pretty too. I took a 3.5 hour walk yesterday, and passed all these picturesque fields. It was amazing.

What are some of your hobbies outside of school?

I love playing tennis, and camping and hiking. I especially love reading. Picking a favorite book is hard, but I would have to say To Kill a Mockingbird. I also really liked The Book Thief, and The Name of the Wind is really cool too.

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